Roofing

March 29-31: Spring construction got off to a big start when Mark Morgan of Bearpaw Design & Construction arrived with his sons to install the metal roofing. The pre-cut-to-length roof panels flew on and by Sunday afternoon the work was nearly done—all except for the “gingerbread”. That’s Mark’s term for edge and ridge trims.

20190329_173518We had a good rhythm going with Mark cutting and bending panels at a workbench, Nate carrying and sliding them up to Joel who screwed them down, and me filling in where needed. My work included peeling off the shrink-wrap that protected each panel from the next. I grew more and more dismayed as trash bag after trash bag filled up. Technically, plastic like this is recyclable but the reality is different. Do any of you know a facility?

The panels came drop-shipped in large wooden crates (wrapped in more plastic). The 2x material isn’t good quality and some of it will split when I bang it apart, but I plan to reuse what I can for blocking and bracing. The rest will be firewood. My sales rep recommended I order two extra panels in case of a miss-cut or the wind taking one but we had no mishaps. Mark will take the extras for his shed and I can take scraps to the local recycling place.

crating  The roof is standing seam steel with a galvalume finish that comes with a 25 year warranty. Most estimates put its lifespan at 50+ years, a nice match to the lifespan of the PV (photovoltaic) panels that will cover a third of the house roof. An installer I spoke with told me that to take down and put PV panels back up for a re-roofing job he’d need $2000—-a cost best avoided.

Metal roofs aren’t very common for homes in our area. They’re more expensive, so to recoup your costs you need to be in the house a LONG time or be confident there’s resale value. Many people find them too stark, too commercial-looking, or too modern-looking and in some cases I agree.

I chose galvalume instead of a painted finish because I like the way it looks and it goes with the casual, contemporary style of my house.  You can get steel in lots of colors but unless it’s gray I think it looks cheesy (think Pizza Hut).  The galvalume fits my aesthetic because it will take on a weathered patina much like a well-used cutting board.  The more common choice—asphalt shingles—wouldn’t meet the long-term durability and low-maintenence goals I set for this project.  They last only 15-20 years and while in theory can be recycled, usually end up as landfill.  Steel is recyclable at the end of it’s useful life.  But to honestly evaluate the “green credentials” of various roofing options you’d have to compare their embodied energy—a moving target that only a few scientist-types have attempted.  It includes the energy to extract, to transport, to manufacture, to install and maintain, and finally to dispose of.

With the roof on, I can now turn my attention to windows and doors!

 

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